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what's your opinion on this? (4 posts)

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  1. Sam

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    ...

    http://www.artschoolreviews.ca/reviews/vancouver-film-school/3d-animation-visual-effects/a-risky-investment

    After reading this I'm so discouraged that I'm considering to stop my 3D learning immediatly and not going to register for a school like vfs or similar.

  2. BrianKenny

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    eh, your experience at a particular school is mainly made up by yourself and your fellow students. You get what you put in. Though I personally think VFS charge too much and that there are just as good alternative places to learn. Plus, VFS is, like the title, more focused on movies, so if you like games more then it might not work for you.

    I do recommend spending 6 months - a year of self learning before considering joining a school as having that knowledge at the beginning of a school course gives you more of an opportunity to gain more advanced techniques from your teachers from day 1.

    Online resources are, of course, available. Digital Tutors is ok for starting but I recommend
    Eat 3d for art and 3d Buzz for technical scripting/ programming. Gnomans kinda a hit and miss depending on who's teaching. Cg Academy has some good 3ds Max stuff.

    Online classes are also getting more popular. One of the better ones I've heard of lately is
    Rydan Workshop. You're still able to ask teachers questions and is a lot cheaper than a school.
    http://www.therydanworkshop.com/

    I will say that if you do join a school, even with preparation, you probably wont get a dream job within the first 6 months. Graduation isn't the end of your education and if you wish to succeed you must consistently continue improving your skills and adding to your portfolio. Many times I have seen people just stop making 3d work after graduation, assuming their current demo reel will do.

    I only recently got a job that could be considered a real foot in the door and I did it with a demo reel that could hardly be recognized as the one that I graduated with at Vanarts.

    Last note, since this is a rigging website, I should point out that having technical skills certainly improves your chances in job hunting.

  3. Sam

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    Hey BrianKelly,

    Nice info of you :).
    I know that i will not get a dreamjob after graduate from whatever school. I don't know why people do think so. Maybe the younger students think like that. I'm now 26 and worked the past 10 years as IT-Technician / Systems Administrator and know that it's not realistic of getting a dreamjob right after graduation. What i wan't is to work in the 3D industry after hitting 30 ages. I would be more then happy with any kind of junior artist employment to improve my skill while working and learning more, to someday maybe make it into my dreamjob.

    I'm learning the art of 3D now for about a year, mostly rigging. But just started to really concentrate to prepare myself to join a school, maybe in a year or two. I guess after two years of self learning, I'll have got a good solid foundation to join the school I will decide for.

    Sadly i don't know any character setup schools out there. On the other side, it's an advantage for those who have strong rigging skills.

    P.S
    The site you linked looks interesting. Thanks for that.

  4. mzahmbie

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    Hey Sam, I just recently graduated from one of the 3D schools out there (Digipen Institute of Technology in Bellevue, WA). I agree with Brian, I wouldn't have the job I do now if I just did my assignments and tried to bank on that to get me work. You have to put in and teach yourself or pursue help from your teachers and other resources outside of class to get what you're paying for at any of the 3d schools out there. If you're really driven you could probably do as well without a school as with, but I did find it helpful to be around a large group of people working on the same things that you are in order to get peer input and learn off of each other as much as the instructors.

    I think my best advice would be to first figure out which field in 3d production you want to get into. Environment, Character, Animation, Post-Process, Technical Art/Animation, etc. Though this is also kind of a double edged sword, no matter which field you're focused on you will benefit from being competent in any of the other fields, and your work can suffer if you entirely focus on one while keeping your blinders up to the rest. Take rigging for example, you are making a product for animators to use. If you don't know animation, how animators are using your rigs, or what matters to animators in their rigs it becomes very easy to make rigs that are difficult for a trained animator to work with.

    I don't know any schools that teach character setup, but here's a shameless plug for the awesome guys over at rigging dojo. http://www.riggingdojo.com/ Josh, Brad and Chad are awesome and very involved in the tech art/character setup community. The one person I know that's been through rigging dojo loved it and came away form it very satisfied with the training. It's pretty similar to animation mentor, but for rigging/scripting, and they tailor the training to the student.

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