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Reverse foot (9 posts)

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  1. greatbear

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    Hi

    I watched a rigging tutorial by digital tutors yesterday which rigged the foot using the reverse foot method, where a separate chain is created from the heel to the ball, to the toe and then to the ankle, giving a pivot point at these junctures.

    Previously i've always done it using groups and shifting pivots at these points, which seem to work just fine. The reverse foot method to me seems a bit cumbersome and over complicated, but there's a strong chance I am overlooking something advantageous?

    Does anyone else use the reverse foot method and if so what are its benefits?

    Cheers

    GB

  2. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    I used to use it all the time yeah.
    With movable pivots on top of it.

    The reverse foot lock doesn't have to be a separate chain, it can be done with anything really, all you need is rotation points, so it can be built with groups, or locators or whatever you want (I used to use empty groups)

    The problem with moving pivots (depending how you implement it) is that you need to manage extra keys and be careful about them. but it all depends

    Javier

  3. greatbear

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    Yeah,

    Thanks for that Javier - I think they were just trying to give a visual representation of the pivots - just made the whole thing a bit heavy and a bit confusing for me.

  4. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    yeah, that's why they often use joints.. so you can see what's actually happening.. and what's parented to what.. but there is no need for it, it can be whatever you want

  5. greatbear

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    On a different note, in the same tut, they built an ik/fk arm in Maya 2011. To my knowledge the only way to do this is to construct 3 joint chains, use one for skinning and the other two to drive it.

    In this tut the guy used just the one chain for both ik and fk - is there some snazzy new feature in maya 2011 that allows you to switch off the ik influence and use the chain as fk? What about joint popping?

    bit confused... I don't wish to publically berate Digital Tutors online, but i wish they'd explain themselves a little better!

  6. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    I thought they had an ik/fk system in Maya 2008 or so. Can't remember, it's been a while.

    Even then, I still always liked the 3 setups. (or more if needed)
    That way you have way more control or each individual setup

  7. mzahmbie

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    What Javier said there is right on, though I don't remember when it was introduced in Maya either, but there's been a method built into the IK chains in Maya that let you turn on/off their influence of the joint chain for a while. In the channel box of an ikHandle you'll see the attribute that drives it called "Ik Blend".

    I tried to use it once thinking that it might simplify an ik/fk limb, but in the end it just felt a bit cumbersome and limiting compared to using the 3(or more!) limb setup. It actually works pretty beautifully if you keep the ikHandle out of any kind of hierarchy, but even with Inherits Transforms off once you have it parented it stops following along with the fk, and then the switching IK/FK snaps the bones around. That's just my experience with it though, there may be a way around that that I'm not familiar with but I decided to just stick with the tried and true multi chain setup.

  8. greatbear

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    I have seen that function in the channel box and often wondered about it - thanks for clearing that up for me.

  9. Mark Neil

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    Posted 6 years ago
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    "but even with Inherits Transforms off once you have it parented it stops following along with the fk, and then the switching IK/FK snaps the bones around. "

    If this is the problem I think your talking about, a solution a colleague found was to create a new attribute with floating point and attach that to the IKBlend attribute. this results in a gradual transition from on to off, rather then a boolean snap. not sure if it still works, as I tend to use the 3 chains myself.

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