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Entry level expectations? (12 posts)

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  1. Mark Neil

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    Now, before I begin, I realize the immediate answer to the question I'm about to ask is "the more, the better", but I was hoping to get some general advice on what I should focus on learning next, therefor...

    I'm curious what rigging technique's are required from entry level applicant, as well as highly desirable skill-sets?

  2. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    The more the better

    You can divide rigging into two camps
    Motion systems
    Deformation

    You can find tons of info on motion systems out there. IK/FK, Spines, etc etc. Those are good to know

    Deformations are a bit tougher, 'cause a lot of studios might use their own tools.

    As far as highly desirable skills go, scripting, programming is always a huge plus. Matrix manipulation can also help, but only on highly specialized studios (like here at DreamWorks)

    What I would suggest is start with one, say motion systems and try to get as familiar as you can with it. Then move to deformations. If you can program, maybe write your own little solutions.

    Hope that helps

  3. Mark Neil

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    It does help somewhat, thank you. For motion system's, I'm pretty comfortable with Basic FK/IK controls, Spline IK, using dynamic curves(hair) and softbody curves to drive IK and set driven key. I'm still working on facial rigging (rather then using blend shapes) and stretchy bone's are next on my list.

    I was looking at some of the hand rig's created in the challenge section of the forum's, and realized that they appeared pretty advanced beyond what I have done to this point. I'm planning to reverse engineer one of them, but that's going to have to wait a little while. I'm hoping that some of those techniques represent the difference between junior and senior level riggers.

  4. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    Reverse engineering is a very good skill to have.
    Way better than somebody showing you this or that technique. If you can figure out how it was built by yourself, you'll be miles ahead, since at the end of the day, figuring out stuff is a huge part of our job

    Good luck

  5. Mark Neil

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    This is a little something a friend and I just did. I'd appreciate any feedback you have on it, particularly as it relates to the original question.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DMZ1kudsEc

  6. mzahmbie

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    First, just want to say that I'm not a professional yet, I'm still a student learning the trade as well. So I can't speak as much on how it relates to the original questions.

    That said, it's looking pretty good for a basic rig set up. However, in the video you don't really show it off. The motions you put the rig and character through are very subtle. I'd suggest pushing the character into some more extreme poses to show what your rig is capable of. If you haven't seen it before Victor Vinyals rigging reel is one that's done very well. http://vimeo.com/3265412 It's a bit beyond entry level, but definitely something to be shooting for.

    A couple of notes:

    Your hip control effects the entire pose of the character, all the way through to arm and wrist rotations in both IK and FK. Rotating the hips should have none, or very little, effect on the upper body.

    I'll put it here again, show off what the rig can do by pushing the character into some extreme poses. It's hard to really see what your rig is capable of when you do subtle movements.

    And a minor note, color controllers for each side of the body. You have the center separate from the limbs, but coloring right and left differently helps an animator pick controls out easier.

    With where you appear to be at I'd suggest looking into space switching. In my opinion it's a good way to take a rig to another level. And reverse engineering is definitely the best way to learn when you can get your hands on rig files. As mr. admin said, problem solving is the key skill and you just don't get that if you're following a tutorial step by step, even though it's a good way to pick up new techniques.

  7. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    Yeah yeah.. that

    Victor's reel is one of the best ones I've ever seen. He does show pretty much everything you want in a rig and you can see all the different things you should have in a rig.

    Even though Victor's reel is rather long, you can easily watch it all since there is so much to take.

    I often get bored watching reels and start fast forwarding. And that's not a good thing

  8. Mark Neil

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    Thanks for the responses.

    mzahmbie, I'll take your suggestions into account for my next rig (the one displayed was largely a means of showing where I currently am for what I'm doing in this thread, as well as helping a friend out with a rig for some still poses).

    Additionally, I'm not familiar with the term "space switching", could you elaborate on that (I may know of the process, just not under that name)?

  9. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    space switching is when you can switch from say a hand being parented to the head, world, hips, etc

    animators love it

  10. mzahmbie

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    what admin said ;p (sorry I don't know your name, I can only assume you are Javier unless admin account is generic to any website/forum admins) Space switching lets a control like your hand switch between following multiple objects in your scene. So the hand can be placed on a moving object and follow that object, then be picked off the object and follow world, and then be placed on the characters head as he panics and the hand will follow his head, etc. In Victor's reel you'll see it in his hands, feet, and head.

    Your rig is looking good though, the controls are clean and straight forward. I especially like the use of the channel box for extra control like fingers/hands rather than more control objects in the scene. One thing that I've seen on a lot of free rigs, and something I've been guilty of too, is storing extra controls on a separate object, or multiple objects. It's a hassle to be animating an arm and then have the fk/ik switch attribute stored on an object at the character's feet. So definitely keep up with having the controls simple(ie. not cluttered in the scene) but powerful.

  11. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    Oops.. yeah.. for some reason I ended up using the admin account instead of mine... and it stuck

    Only one admin.. me

    Javier

  12. Javier "Goosh" Solsona (admin)

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    Posted 7 years ago
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    There.. changed

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